Agrigento

Acitrezza Agrigento Catania Cefalý Corleone Marsala Monreale Mount Etna Norman Mosaics Palermo Piazza Armerina Santo Stefano di Camastra Segesta Sicilian Lunch Siracusa Stagnone Lagoon Taormina Trapani

Agrigento

Agrigento Heritage Greek Temple Museo Archeologico Temple of Zeus

 

the town of Agrigento on the hill behind the olive trees

Agrigento (Latin Agrigentum; Greek Akragas), city, Italy, southern Sicily, capital of Agrigento Province, on the Mediterranean Sea. The city is a tourist and an agricultural center; manufactures include processed cement, sulfur, and furniture. The city has ruins of some 20 Doric temples (6th and 5th century BC) and an archaeological museum.

 

telamon figure from the temple of Zeus
now in the Archaeological Museum

Photos from the Archaeological Museum

Photos from the Temple of Zeus

Photos from 1976


Agrigento was founded by Greeks from the city of Gela about 582 BC and became an important trading and cultural center with a population of about 200,000. After 406 BC, when it was sacked by a force from Carthage, the city (then known as Akragas) declined in importance, although it remained large. In 262 BC it was incorporated into the Roman Empire and became known as Agrigentum. It was called Girgenti from the early Middle Ages until 1927, when the name was officially changed to Agrigento. Population 55,877 (1997 estimate).

Text from Microsoft Encarta
 

Odeon
the Ekklesiasterion
(built in the 3rd century BC for public meetings)


Temple of Hercules
 

the temple of Hercules

More Photos of the Temple of Hercules

 

 

 


The Ridge Tuft Rock and
Roman and Byzantine tombs

 

 

 

 

 

looking from the ridge to the sea

 

 

the English gentleman who once had this villa within today's archeological park

 

remains from Greek and Roman times

 

fruit of the cactus

 

flower of the yucca


temple of Concorde

 

 

The temple of Concorde is the only temple still standing in its whole. It was built in 430 BC, and in the 6th century BC it was changed into a sacred building. You can still see the arches included in the central cell walls. Here there are massive tapered columns and the frieze is decorated with triglyphs and metopes. The name Concorde comes from a Latin inscription founded nearby the temple itself.

 

 

 

 


Temple of Hera

 

 

The temple of Hera Lacinia (Juno) was built around the 5th century BC and set on fire by the Carthaginians in 406 BC. It was attributed to Juno, the goddess of marriage and birth, and it still keeps unchanged the entrance cell colonnade (in part restored in the 20th century).

 

 

crew doing restoration work

 

 

 


 

mobile tourist curio stand

Photos of the Agrigento Heritage program 


Agrigento Heritage Greek Temple Museo Archeologico Temple of Zeus

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